The Ultimate Guide To Suit Fabric Types (2022)

Why Does Suit Fabric Matter?

There are two main factors that decide on a suit’s quality and cost: construction and fabric. This is the suiting equivalent to parts and labor on a car.

We went over garment construction in detail in our article on made-to-measure suits, but very quickly, suits are made with either fused, half, or full canvas interlinings onto which fabric is either glued (fused) or sewn. Glued suits are cheaper, sewn suits are more expensive.

Fabric is the other main factor that decides a suit’s quality and cost. Good fabric will feel better, hold its shape for longer, and look better for its lifespan. As you might imagine, it’s a more expensive product than its lower-quality counterparts.

Suit Fabric Types

Wool

Wool is without a doubt the most common fabric used for men’s suit’s. In fact, the information about it gets so extensive that we gave wool its own separate page.

With that said, here are the benefits of wool in a quick list:

  • It breathes easily
  • It resists wrinkling
  • It’s flame-resistant, which is convenient for well-dressed firefighters or those of us who work as stunt doubles
  • It’s naturally water-resistant
  • It feels good
  • It keeps you warm in winter and lets you ventilate in the summer
  • It tailors well

Linen

Linen is a hugely popular summertime fabric. It also happens to be vegan as it comes from a flax plant, not an animal. In fact, linen is technically a vegetable.

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One of the oldest fabrics in existence (the ancient Egyptians were known to wear linen), it’s still one of the most widely used, especially in continental Europe. It’s expensive but its cost can be justified from these benefits:

  • Breathability: Linen breathesvery easily. This makes it a great summer fabric.
  • Casual élan: Linen wrinkles naturally and easily. It’s futile to fight it, you can only embrace it or choose to not wear linen. The wrinkling is part of the fabric’s charm and makes it great for casual outings.

Cotton

Though it’s the fabric of our lives, cotton suiting is a little tougher to find than wool suits. Generally less expensive than wool and linen, high-end cotton suits can be pulled off in office environments and also for more celebratory events such as weddings. Note: cotton trousers don’t drape like linen or wool, so make sure that they have a crease sharp enough to cut butter.

Here are some of the selling points of cotton:

  • Cost: Cotton suiting tends to be cheaper than wools and linens of similar quality. If you’re looking for a summer suit but are on a budget, think about cotton.
  • Care: While we don’t recommend it, you can machine wash a cotton suit in a pinch. Cotton is generally easier to care for than wool and doesn’t need to be brushed like wool to maintain its lifespan. Further, you can iron it pretty easily.
  • Lightweight: Cotton makes for a physically light suit that’s easier to wear when it’s hot. Beware, however: cotton absorbs moisture, so if you’re a sweaty guy, think twice.

Silk

It’s pretty rare to see a 100% silk suit nowadays. That sort of thing is generally limited to the like of Prince Charles while vacationing in the tropics. It’s more likely that you’ll see silk as part of a suit’s fabrication (60% worsted wool and 40% silk, for example). It is sometimes used in high-end suit linings, but this should only be done if the customer really loves a lining’s design, as synthetic silks like viscose are actually stronger than the original article.

Silk has many benefits, such as:

  • Hand: Silk feels beautiful on the hand and against the skin. It’s light, airy, and incredibly smooth.
  • Luxurious comfort: Such a feel makes silk a luxury item, and its breathability is right on par with wool.

Mohair

Mohair is made from the hair of the angora goat. It’s similar to wool but has a bit of a shine to it. It’s also known for a “bite” to its hand, which is a bit of a scratchiness. It performs well and resist wrinkling like no other fabric.

Vicuña

Vicuña refers to both a piece of fabric and the animal from which that fabric is harvested. It’s like cashmere on steroids. A llama relative, the vicuña lives in the Andes and is raised specifically for its coat. They produce extremely small amounts of superfine wool that is the softest and warmest in its class.

The trick is that vicuñas can only be shorn every three years, and they must be caught from the wild to do this (there are no vicuña farms, for example). This makes it astronomically expensive. As of June 2007, vicuña cost anywhere between $1,800 and $3,000per yard.

Even on the low end, when we consider the fact that a suit requires four yards of fabric to make, that’s $7200 on fabric alone, before even considering construction!

You might be better off getting a vicuña scarf instead, for a measly $1,500 or so.

A Note On Synthetic Suit Fabrics

The 1970s especially were a decade in which suits made of synthetic materials, especially polyester, were all the rage. These “high-tech” fabrics were easier to care for and less expensive than natural fibers. Seems like a great alternative to wool and cotton, right?

Eh. not so much.

Unless your budget is such that you cannot afford a suit made of natural fibers, we do not suggest buying a suit withany synthetic material used in its outer shell (a synthetic lining is just fine). It doesn’t breathe well and simply lacks the polished presentation that natural fibers do.

Whenever possible, buy suits made with natural fibers.

(Video) How to choose a fabric for your suit

Different Types Of Fabric Weaves

First, a bit of terminology to get us all on the same page:

  • Warp: The lengthwise (up-and-down) yarns of a given fabric
  • Weft: The crosswise (left-to-right) yarns of a given fabric

A fabric’s quality and character aren’t just a function of what that fabric is. The manner in which it’s woven plays a huge role.

Generally, the best fabrics are “two-ply,” meaning that even single fibers are, in fact, two fibers twisted together very tightly. Further, top cloths are woven in a “two-by-two” format, which means that both the warp and weft threads are two-ply.

There are two main types of weaves: plain and twill.We’ll go further in-depth below.

Plain Weaves

A weave using a simple over-and-under pattern in which the threads are simply horizontal and vertical. Below are some common ones.

Bedford Cord

The Ultimate Guide To Suit Fabric Types (3)Native to Bedford, England, Bedford cord resembles corduroy but with a less-pronounced wale (“wale” refers to the ridges characteristic of corduroy clothes).

Not often seen in business suits, but typical of riding and hunting clothes.

Birdseye

An all-over weave in which tiny dots are created that resemble the eye of a bird. The overall effect is to appear solid from a distance and only be noticed when up close and personal. Birdseye suits are an excellent solution for a man who prefers solid suits but wants a bit of extra visual interest with regard to texture.

Nailhead

A small dotted design suggestive of a nail head.

Seersucker

The Ultimate Guide To Suit Fabric Types (4)A dimpled weave achieved by altering the tension of the warp threads, this was taken from an Indian method of weaving silk.

Traditionally in a blue-and-white striped pattern in cotton, the term “seersucker” is a corruption of the Hindi wordsirśakar, which is derived from the Persianshir-o-shakar, meaning “milk and honey.”

Seersucker makes for an excellent summer suit.

Tropical

A plain weave wherein two-ply yarns arenot used, which creates a lighter-weight, more breathable garment well-suited to the tropics.

Twill Weaves

The Ultimate Guide To Suit Fabric Types (5)Twills are actually very easily identifiable: they have a diagonal pattern that’s kind of “baked in” to the fabric’s texture. If you look very closely at one of your suits, you’ll probably see it.

(Video) Wool SUPER Numbers Explained - What Do Suit Fabric Super 100s, 180s... Mean?

It’s achieved by laying warp threads out straight and parallel, while the weft threads are woven over and under the warp threads.

Worsted Wool

Worsted threads make up the majority of what we know as suits. They’re smooth, lustrous to the touch, and are the opposite of “woolen” threads, which are shorter, hairier fibers.

Worsted suiting can range from cloth made with light threads to heavy cloths with a flannel-like finish.

Flannel

An incredibly common twill, flannel has a “napped” surface that feels, well hairy. These are excellent fabrics for cold weather.

Tweed

The Ultimate Guide To Suit Fabric Types (6)

Diagonal twill made with thick yarn. Tweed’s texture is rough and wooly, making it great for your typical British autumn or winter.

Serge

A simple twill weave in which fine threads are used to create a matte surface. Navy blazers are typically made from serge.

Gabardine

Much less popular now than it was fifty years ago, gabardine is a style of twill that has more warp threads than weft. Woven tightly, gabardine is stiffer and a bit less breathable than other weaves, but it travels well.

Houndstooth

The Ultimate Guide To Suit Fabric Types (7)

A weave creating a houndstooth check

A weave that you should really only see on odd pieces andnot full suits, houndstooth is a twill that interweaves four light-colored threads and four dark-colored ones to create a pattern that resembles a dog’s tooth. Small-scale versions are referred to as “puppytooth.”

Barleycorn

Contrasting warp and weft colors are woven to create small, repeating clusters of three. The overall effect is to create alternating light- and dark-colored triangles, which kind of resembles a barley stalk.

Herringbone

The Ultimate Guide To Suit Fabric Types (8)

A herringbone weave

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A weave that has V-shapes running through it. When looked at as a whole, the effect is that of a fish’s skeleton, hence the name. Subtle, monochromatic versions of this weave are popular for suits, while bolder versions make for excellent sport coats.

Sharkskin

A tight twill weave in two similar but distinct colors, like dark and medium grey, or midnight blue and navy blue. Also known as a “pick-and-pick.”

Seasonal Guide To Fabrics

Best Fabrics For Summer

Choosing the right fabric is key when getting a summer suit. You want something lightweight and airy, but still with enough drape to look like the handsome suit it needs to be. Regardless of fabric, seek out suits with half or eight linings as these will allow you to ventilate a bit more easily.

The Ultimate Guide To Suit Fabric Types (9)Some of the best fabrics for summer are:

  • Wool: In tropical weights like 7.5 ounces or lighter, wool is an excellent, if surprising, option for warm weather. It has all the positive attributes of wool, but the lighter weight make it perfect for summer.
  • Cotton: We love us a cotton khaki suit. Suiting cotton is lightweight and inherently a bit casual, much like the summertime itself. Wearing cotton suits to job interviews or funerals is generally avoided, where the dressiness of wool is necessary to make the right impression. Seersucker suits are made of cotton and are great for summertime celebrations.
  • Linen: Linen is an airy fabric that performs beautifully in the summertime. Its tendency to wrinkle adds to its charm, and it’s synonymous with summertime. A word to the wise: linen can be a heavy fabric, weighing up to 11 or even 12 ounces per yard in some instances.

Best Materials For Winter

Winter is the opposite of summer in many ways, and it’s no different with regard to suiting fabrics. Instead of maintaining airiness and a sense of being lightweight, you want to maintain warmth at all costs. Thick, hairy fabrics are what we have in mind.

The Ultimate Guide To Suit Fabric Types (10)Top winter fabrics are:

  • Wool: When wool is made in heavier weights, the benefits are wide-ranging. Not only does it keep you warmer, but it’s also easier to tailor. Look for wools in 10 ounces or more to help keep the chill at bay.
  • Flannel: Yes, we know that flannel is a particular type of weave, but it’s worth a mention here. Flannel suits aren’t nearly as popular as they used to be (thanks, central heating), but in sober colors and patterns, they make excellent business suits that can negate the need for an overcoat on some days.
  • Vicuña: Though this fabric is outrageously expensive (a suit made of vicuña can easily run you into the five-figure mark), it will keep you warm and looking magnificent.

Best Suit Cloth For Autumn

Depending on where you live and what mood global climate change is in, you’re probably going to want to live in a bunch of medium-weight fabrics in the autumn. Lucky you: just about any suit sold off the rack is of medium weight cloth, so you have the pick of the litter.

  • Wool: There’s a reason we’ve suggested wool with each season so far: it works, and it works well. In a run-of-the-mill nine-ounce weight, a worsted wool suit will protect you from the forty degree mornings and keep you comfortable in sixty degree afternoons.
  • Flannel: Some autumn days are colder than others. reach into the flannel section of your wardrobe to ward off the November chill.
  • Cashmere: Technically a type of wool, cashmere offers warmth, is lightweight, and feels phenomenal to the hand. Even a suit with 10% of its fabrication as cashmere will feel better than one with none, so keep your eyes peeled for this luxurious fabric.

Best Suiting Fabric For Springtime

The Ultimate Guide To Suit Fabric Types (11)

Cotton twill suit fabric

Springtime is similar to autumn on the weather front. Early April is still chilly, but mid-June can be extremely hot. You’ll want to be prepared for either of these extremes and everything in between.

  • Mohair: Mohair comes from the angora goat, making it different from wool. It has a bit of natural sheen and a certain “crunch” to the hand. It also has exceptional “bounce back.” Good mohair can be balled into your fist, released, and smoothed back out perfectly with barely any effort. It makes for a great spring suit.
  • Silk: While a suit of 100% silk is often prohibitively expensive, finding a suit with some silk in its fabrication will lend it a beautiful sheen and a lightweight feel. Silk is typically combined with…
  • Cotton: Cotton has enough heft to ward off a breeze but is lightweight enough to deal with the season’s sunshine. Perfect for spring.

Final Thoughts On Fabrics

The fabric world is vast and varied, and even the relatively small amount reviewed in this article can be dizzying.

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Know that, ultimately, the lion’s share of your suits will be worsted wool, and the biggest decisions you’ll face will be around color and pattern. For further guidance on these topics, check out our suits home page or take a look at our page on the capsule wardrobe.

Alternatively, read our in-depth guides of different fabrics. They’re all listed in the menu above but here are a few of our favorites:

  • Seersucker Guide
  • Linen Guide
  • Mohair Guide
  • Gabardine Guide
  • Silk Guide

FAQs

What is the most breathable fabric for suits? ›

Science tells us that natural fibres like linen, wool and cotton tend to be the best for regulating body temperature.

What is the best thread count for suits? ›

The optimal thread count is a super 100 to 120, Ostrove advises. "The higher the number, the finer the yarn, which makes it more durable, soft and silky." But don't be tempted to go too high. Once you get into the 200s, the suit may look beautiful, but it becomes more fragile.

What are expensive suits made of? ›

Most expensive suits should be made from at least a pure wool. If you want quality, never choose polyester mixes. Ideally you're looking for anything above a Super 100s wool. This means the fabric is smoother and has less thread count per meter, making it super soft and luxurious to touch and feel.

What are high end suits made of? ›

Luxury Fibers

The most common is cashmere, a yarn spun from the hair of the cashmere goat. Alpaca, silk and mohair (yarn from the the hair of the angora goat) are also commonplace at many tailor shops. The most luxurious fiber comes from vicuña, a relative of the alpaca that lives in the Andes.

How do you know if a fabric suit is good quality? ›

Good quality suits have a lining at the hem that is hung, folded, and pressed. You want your lining to breathe well. The breathability of your lining should match the outer fabric. Lining made of rayon is an indicator of a quality suit.

What suit material is shiny? ›

Polyester Suits

Unfortunately, polyester fabrics also wrinkle more than wool. The polyester fibers can appear shiny in some light, which will also contribute to making these suits look cheap. They're also not ideal for extreme temperatures because they don't breathe very well.

Which suits are best for summer? ›

Top 5 Suits for Spring & Summer
  1. Fresco. Fresco is a lightweight fabric made from tropical wool with a porous weave designed for maximum air circulation. ...
  2. Linen. The linen suit is the ultimate Spring/Summer go-to. ...
  3. Hopsack. ...
  4. Seersucker. ...
  5. Tropical Wool.

Which colour 3 piece suit is best? ›

“Three piece suits tend to be dressier than a regular two-piece,” says Liang. “Therefore, we normally recommend navy, charcoal or light grey as a starting point for a three-piece commission.”

What's a twill suit? ›

Twill is a weave with a pattern of diagonal parallel ribs. It's perhaps the most widespread of the weaves used in suiting.

What are business suits made of? ›

They are often made of either wool or polyester (although many other synthetic and natural textiles are used) and may be designed to be worn with a matching suit jacket.

Is 100% wool the best suit? ›

As a general rule, 100% wool suits, more specifically Merino wool, are the most versatile and appropriate for all occasions. They breathe in summer and keep you warm in winter.

What does Super 150 mean in a suit fabric? ›

Suits that using Super 150's to 200's are suits made from fabrics that are incredibly fine and almost silk like in their texture and weight. These luxury fabrics are unbelievably soft to touch and wear.

What is a super 110 suit? ›

The 'S' or Super rating relates to 'fine quality wool' and fineness of the fibres used in 110s men's suiting fabric. Our large selection of Super 110s tailoring cloth is light and durable so an ideal option for an everyday made-to-measure suit .

Why are Italian suits expensive? ›

Italian suits are some of the most expensive in the world, and there are a few reasons for this. Firstly, the materials used to make them are of a higher quality than most other suits. Secondly, they take longer to make, as they are all hand-tailored.

How much should a suit jacket cost? ›

The Basic Suit ranges from $300 to $599, though it is easy to spend more. It's considered to be a solid price point for the first suit. This category includes the most common fit types, wool/poly blend materials, and basic color schemes.

How can you tell if a suit is expensive? ›

Hallmarks of Expensive Bespoke Suits For Men - Gentleman's Gazette

What are Italian suits made of? ›

Italian wool suits are defined by their use of Italian wool. They aren't made of regular wool. Rather, they are made of Italian wool. Italian wool is first harvested, after which it's used in the construction of Italian wool suits.

What is a sharkskin suit made out of? ›

Sharkskin has historically been made with different types of natural fibers, including either mohair, wool and silk. More expensive variations, often demarcated by fabric content labels bearing "Golden Fleece", "Royal" or the like, indicate an extremely rare and costly "sharkskin" of yester-year.

Do silk suits wrinkle? ›

Silk suits tend to show water marks and sweat marks rather too easily. They don't breathe as well as linen. As with other lightweight suit fabrics, silk wrinkles easily and creasing can become permanent if not dealt with quickly.

Are polyester suits good? ›

Polyester linings are not only cheap but they also make you feel hot and they don't breathe very well which makes for a very uncomfortable suit wearing experience. On top of that, they wear out quickly. So not only are they bad, but they're really great in helping you to identify if you have a bad suit in front of you.

Which is the best wool for suits? ›

But the finest wool for gentlemen's business suits is Australian merino wool. It contains many natural properties and is remarkably soft and luxurious. Merino wool is also very elastic – suits stretch yet retain their shape. Merino fibers are also very breathable and react well to body-temperature changes.

Why do suits look cheap? ›

Suits made of synthetic materials such as polyester can lose their shape, and wrinkle and crease more. They also suffer from shininess, giving it that characteristic 'cheap' look.

What is the glitter fabric called? ›

Sequin fabric is fully covered material with plastic or metal-shaped pieces popularly known as sequin, they can vary in size shape, or color. The fabric which consists of sequins is mostly tulle or chiffon on which they are present. Sequins are available in different shapes like oval, square, polygon, etc.

What is a crisp shiny fabric called? ›

Taffeta is a crisp, plain-woven fabric made most often from silk, but it can also be woven with polyester, nylon, acetate, or other synthetic fibers. Taffeta fabric typically has a lustrous, shiny appearance.

How do you wear a suit in hot weather? ›

Here are a tips for staying fresh that you can use wherever you are.
  1. First and foremost: Stay hydrated. ...
  2. Wear suits with open weave fabrics like high twist wools, fresco, linen, and cotton. ...
  3. Have your spring and summer suit jackets half lined or self lined. ...
  4. Wear suits in lighter blues, grays and tans. ...
  5. Wear an undershirt.
25 Jun 2013

Are linen suits good for hot weather? ›

Linen suits are great for summertime because they are extremely thin. Linen is also a natural fabric and as you know, natural fabrics are more breathable and more comfortable to wear.

What is a chambray suit? ›

The Chambray Suit

Chambray, also known as cambric, is a lightweight cotton fabric that is slightly glossy, very comfortable, and perfect for summer. Recently, labels from Valentino to Armani to J. Crew have been introducing chambray in summer business suiting.

What is a 5 piece suit? ›

A 5 piece suit contains all of the parts of a suit and is considered to be the most formal look. A 5 piece suit includes a matching suit jacket, trousers, a waistcoat (vest), a bowtie/tie and a dress shirt.

Should I wear a belt with a 3 piece suit? ›

Do you wear a belt with a 3 piece suit? You should not wear a belt with a three-piece suit because it will cause the waistcoat to bunch up. With this design, the fit is always essential, and anything that compromises it will not look good.

Can I wear a 3 piece suit without a tie? ›

Yes, You Can Wear a Three-Piece Suit Without a Tie

Unless you're following a dress code that specifically calls for the use of a tie, you can omit this accessory from your three-piece suit. Even without a tie, three-piece suit will offer a high level of formality that's appropriate for most formal occasions.

What is gabardine fabric? ›

gabardine, any of several varieties of worsted, cotton, silk, and mixed tightly woven fabrics, embodying certain features in common and chiefly made into suits and overcoats. It is a relatively strong and firm cloth, made with a twill weave, and somewhat resembling whipcord but of lighter texture.

What is a birdseye suit? ›

Birdseye (Bird's Eye or Birds-Eye) is an all over woven suiting made from a small geometric pattern with a dot suggesting a bird's eye. The fancy-solid suiting fabric is a favourite of bespoke tailors and their more stylish patrons.

What is the difference between twill and tweed? ›

Twill refers to a method of fabric weaving. This method of weaving consists of passing the weft threads over one and under two in order to create the appearance of diagonal lines or ribs. So twill and tweed are two separate things… but twill tweed refers to a wool tweed fabric that is woven in the twill fashion.

What is a 7 piece suit? ›

• 7 piece set: Jacket, Pants, Vest, Shirt, Neck-Tie, Bow-Tie, Pocket Square.

What's the difference between a business suit and formal suit? ›

Formal suits may require a slip to be worn underneath. The slip should not be visible. Business suits require you wear pantyhose and closed toe shoes. Casual suits for women may include pants and not require hosiery.

What is 3 piece suit called? ›

Sometimes called a waistcoat suit, a 3-piece suit consists of a matching set of waistcoat (vest), jacket and trousers. Typically, this type of suit consists of a double-breasted vest worn under a single-breasted jacket.

How do you know if a fabric suit is good quality? ›

Good quality suits have a lining at the hem that is hung, folded, and pressed. You want your lining to breathe well. The breathability of your lining should match the outer fabric. Lining made of rayon is an indicator of a quality suit.

Why are wool suits better? ›

Wool is naturally water and dirt resistant, as well as being extremely durable, making it the perfect long-lasting option for a suit. Additionally, wool easily maintains its shape and is also incredibly breathable. Even when blended with other materials, wool still maintains many of its advantages.

What suit material is shiny? ›

Polyester Suits

Unfortunately, polyester fabrics also wrinkle more than wool. The polyester fibers can appear shiny in some light, which will also contribute to making these suits look cheap. They're also not ideal for extreme temperatures because they don't breathe very well.

What type of material are suits made from? ›

Many tailors will advise you to purchase suits made from natural fibres due to their quality and breathability. However, over the past few decades, suits made from synthetic fabrics such as polyester and viscose provide an affordable alternative for formal looks.

Is 100% wool the best suit? ›

As a general rule, 100% wool suits, more specifically Merino wool, are the most versatile and appropriate for all occasions. They breathe in summer and keep you warm in winter.

What is a sharkskin suit made out of? ›

Sharkskin has historically been made with different types of natural fibers, including either mohair, wool and silk. More expensive variations, often demarcated by fabric content labels bearing "Golden Fleece", "Royal" or the like, indicate an extremely rare and costly "sharkskin" of yester-year.

How long will a good suit last? ›

The average lifespan of a good bespoke suit should last for 5 – 10 years.

Are wool suits too hot for summer? ›

Traditional wool suits can be very hot and uncomfortable during the spring and summer, but lightweight wool, linen, cotton, and even performance suits can provide you with the comfort you need during warmer weather.

Are wool suits itchy? ›

Some people have a favorite wool sweater while others may itch just looking at it. Being sensitive to wool clothing and materials is very common. People report runny noses, watery eyes, and especially, a skin irritation when they wear wool.

Why do suits look cheap? ›

Suits made of synthetic materials such as polyester can lose their shape, and wrinkle and crease more. They also suffer from shininess, giving it that characteristic 'cheap' look.

What is the glitter fabric called? ›

Sequin fabric is fully covered material with plastic or metal-shaped pieces popularly known as sequin, they can vary in size shape, or color. The fabric which consists of sequins is mostly tulle or chiffon on which they are present. Sequins are available in different shapes like oval, square, polygon, etc.

What is a crisp shiny fabric called? ›

Taffeta is a crisp, plain-woven fabric made most often from silk, but it can also be woven with polyester, nylon, acetate, or other synthetic fibers. Taffeta fabric typically has a lustrous, shiny appearance.

How many types of suits are there? ›

There are three basic types of suits that are perfect for different occasions. 1. Two-piece suit: A two-piece suit is the most basic type of suit, consisting of a suit jacket and matching trousers. This is the type of suit you might wear to a job interview.

What's a twill suit? ›

Twill is a weave with a pattern of diagonal parallel ribs. It's perhaps the most widespread of the weaves used in suiting.

What is gabardine fabric? ›

gabardine, any of several varieties of worsted, cotton, silk, and mixed tightly woven fabrics, embodying certain features in common and chiefly made into suits and overcoats. It is a relatively strong and firm cloth, made with a twill weave, and somewhat resembling whipcord but of lighter texture.

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